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rupert murdoch with tough questions later today, outraged over a string of allegations reporters for the paper hacked mobile phones to get scoops. murdoch's apologized. much more on the story justice ahead on "world business today." one of the first journal itss who exposed phone hacking by "news of the world" has been found dead. sean ward said andy coulson hacked into phones. police are not treating the death as suspicious. >>> a u.s. official says a meeting between the u.s. and libya at the weekend was meant to deliver one message, that moammar gadhafi must go. libya called the face-to-face talks in tunisia a first step. the u.s. says the meeting was a one-off event. >>> the women's world cup team soaked up the limelight after bringing japan its first cup title. japan's the first asian nation with a world cup championship. those are the headlines. auto' jane verjee at cnn in london. "world business today" starts now. >> a very good afternoon to you from cnn hong kong, i'm alicia tank. >> good morning from cnn london. you're watching "world business today." time to testify, new
hours, rupert murdoch will face parliament. we're live in london. >> no break in the debt ceiling talks but the white house insists that backstage progress is being made to reach a deal before the august 2nd default deadline on this "american morning." >>> good morning to you. thank you for being with us. 6:00 a.m. in new york this morning. tuesday, july 19th. i was hearing that in parts of iowa the heat index felt like 130 yesterday. it's been brutal out there. >> even this morning on the east coast, it felt different. it felt hotter. we'll be covering that. >>> we're watching that and millions are watching with a worldwide media empire hanging in the balance rupert murdoch is just hours away from facing his defining moment. in less than four hours, murdoch, his son and former top newspaper executive will appear before the british parliament. >> they will be asked what they knew about this phone hacking scandal that's growing wider by the day. it's threatening to take down news corp and perhaps murdoch himself. >> and the question is what they are going to be called upon to explain, wh
begin with developments surrounding the scandal threadening rupert murdoch's media empire as the mogul and his son prepare to appear before parliament today. police have arrested 11 people since this hacking and bribery allegation scandal emerged, including the former ceo of murdoch's news international group, that's her, rebekah brooks. and in another new twist for the story, a former "news of the world" reporter and the scandal's first named whistleblower was found dead yesterday. there is an ongoing investigation, but police say the death is quote -- not suspicious. for the latest on this investigation, and a preview of today's testimony, jim maceda is joining us live now from london. jim, thanks for your time. i want to get off the bat to what the "new york times" is reporting today, that aides close to the murdoch family spent years and millions of dollars, the "times" reports, covering up wrongdoing at "news of the world." what more do we know about this? >> well, i think most importantly what the question that people are asking here, and especially back in the states now is how
this hour, also the connection between the rupert murdoch scandal today and the mobster guy. remember him? and the interview on tonight's show is so exciting it made me and several segment producers -- made us break something in the office while we were preparing for the interview. while prepping tonight's interview, we broke some of the ceiling tiles outside my office door. i am very sorry, and i'll pay for it. >>> this is the mayor of london, his name is boris. he's in the conservative party. when questioned about it last year, here's what he had to say about the rupert murdoch phone hacking scandal. >> cooked up by labor party. >> cooked up by the labor party. phone hacking, made up by liberals. no such thing. where did mayor boris get his information? mayor boris got his information from john yates, the number two police officer in london. john yates, who it just so happens had to resign as the number two police officer in london just this week as did the number one police officer in london, the chief of scotland yard. that is just one of the ways the whole rupert murdoch scandal is g
some are calling a cozy relationship with rupert murdoch's media empire. >> go to used of parliament this morning. fireworks yesterday. the consensus, though, is david cameron is not likely to lose his job over this but that he's under enormous pressure right now. >> reporter: he's definitely is. he's got a lot to defend himself today. basically, this is a special day in parliament. they were supposed to go into summer recess but instead they are having this special address by the prime minister here. he's really going to try to prove a point here, that he's is going to underline the phone hacking scandal, say this is how i dealt with it and now we need to move on. here is how he put it when he was in africa for a trip. >> i don't underestimate the problem. parts of the immediate okay dreadful, illegal acts. police have questionses to answer about corruption and a failed investigation. politicians have been too close to media onus. these are big proximate but we're a big country and we'll solve it. >> reporter: now, the main issue he's going to have to teal with is why he decided to
phone hacking and alleged corruption in rupert murdoch's newspaper empire. police commissioner john yates said he had been i don't think in 2009 not to reopen an investigation into the affair, but had acted with complete integrity. meanwhile, the journalist who first claimed that andy knew about alleged malpractices at the "news of the world" has been found dead at his home. >> he is yates of the yard no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, the commissioner of the metropolitan police, both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal. so said the mayor of london. >> i regret to say they have just come off the phone with a.c. john yates who has tendered his resignation. >> boris johnson insisted that both men had jumped and were not pushed. he made it abundantly clear he did everything to encourage them. >> i think the support to john yates and the issues and questions and circumstances is going to make it very difficult for them to continue to do their jobs in a way that they wanted. >> john yates began the day determined not to resign telling collea
-out quarter. >>> media mogul rupert murdoch and his son faced certain questions from uk legislators. now the phone hacking saga rolls on with a new parliamentary report saying murdoch's news international, quote, deliberately tried to obstruct a police investigation into the now defunct "news of the world". in the meantime, prime minister david cameron is getting ready to make an emergency statement on this crisis after flying back early from a trade trip to south africa. >>> many of us here in hong kong watched that testimony and we stayed up pretty late to watch it. rupert murdoch denied any knowledge of phone hacking at the "news of the world," but it was his son james who actually did most of the talking, intervening when his father seemed at a loss for words. it was murdoch's wife wendy who intervened in a very different way. dan rivers has the details for us. >> i would just like to say one sentence. this is the most humble day of my life. >> reporter: this was how rupert murdoch started. despite his apparent contrition, he surely had no idea what was about to literally hit him. wh
that scotland yard has made an arrest in the scandal that has rocked rupert murdoch's media empire and yet another remainor how serious the hacking investigation is. london's top police officer faces a public grilling today. dan rivers is on that for us. dan, what do you think? >> reporter: paul stevenson, the top policeman in the uk, is being questioned at the moment by the metropolitan police authority. particularly coming under pressure because, this morning, they arrested a former deputy editor i "the news of the world" neil wallace, arrest number nine as part of this and the other inquiry into corrupt or bribing police officials for information. now, the important thing is here is already we know one of the senior policemen in scotland yard john yates has already admitted having lunches with neil wallace, the man now arrested. a lot of pressure on one senior policeman, john yates, therefore, top pleasure on the top policemen. rupert and james murdoch are hounded in the people behind the building me to come and appear and justify what happened in their newspapers. james murdoch saying
by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. -- this could impact the rupert murdoch empire, i am joined by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. what can they say that will reassure shareholders? >> i think shareholders will want to hear that the worst is past. there's a sense among shareholders -- viavoice given rupert murdoch -- they have always given rupert murdoch a bit of a break. there has always been a bit of a murdoch discount thinking he is going to do what he wants to do and do not always what is best for shareholders. they've given him a break because he has a good view long- term of where the company is going. now he and his management team look like a group that is not in front of the news. they continue to get hammered by events. they are not prepared for it. they're constantly reacting. i think shareholders will want to see that the worst is behind them and they have their arms around this and know where it will go from here. >> is there any threat to the murdochs themselves? are their personal reputations so damaged it is now a liability for management? >> there i
. i welcome the apology from rupert murdoch. we respect the decision of support to stand down. we're beginning to see answer is given. this is right. >> i have a number of questions for the prime minister. he said a few moments ago that the remainder should be heard in silence. i say the same to members that are now heckling. think about what the public thinks about the behavior order and stop it without delay. >> the prime minister said that he was excluded from the decision making process. it is not quite answer the questions he has been asked. last friday he revealed that since taking office he had met representatives including rebekah brooks and james murdock on 26 separate locations. my question is whether he can assure the house that the bid was not raised at any of those meetings. was there at any time he discussed the bid with officials of the culture? >> 10 days ago, the prime minister said i was not given any specific information that would lead you to change my mind. it would have made every effort to uncover the information. they made every effort for the facts. did wo
may have been a victim of phone hacking by an investigator working for rupert murdoch's newspapers. more now on the story from bbc's newsnight. >> it is like an entire enemy in system going into violent reaction. suddenly, those he wanted to smile on him find rupert murdoch's -- >> i think they should be focused on clearing goes up rather than on the next corporate moves. >> the affliction spread as other news international paper's are accused of invading the privacy of gordon brown and his family. we have new details on how boredom brown reacted. it happened at the moment of rupert murdoch was supposed to take a bigger role in british life. rumors swirling around a news international this afternoon are that to save the sky deal, rupert murdoch might drop all of his united kingdom newspapers. more accusations that the police were corrected in exchange for information. also, enough air-conditioning to pay for football in the desert. how did a country persuade fifa to have them play the world cup. >> it fits the prejudice that people have in their mind. an arab nation could not have
" but also at "the sun" and "the sunday times," both owned by rupert murdoch. former prime minister gordon brown believes some of his bank account details were illegally obtained by the "sunday times." >> "the sunday times" appear to have got access to my account. they got access to my legal files. but i'm shocked. i'm generally shocked to find that this happened because of the leads. >> reporter: he was shattered to learn that the sun was going public with the news that his baby son had cystic fibrosis. something the family had kept strictly confidential. the person who told the browns that "the sun" would run a story on their baby's illness was rebecca brooks. at the time the editor of the sun newspaper, she's now rupert murdoch's british ceo and is herself being questioned by police. john yates, the officer you saw earlier on in my report, has just told the committee that he's 99% sure his phone was hacked, which shows that police investigating the news of the world were themselves not immune. chris? >> i'll tell you, this story grows more and more every day. cbs' elizabeth palmer for u
will see how a newsnight" is covering the investigation ahead of the parliament hearing with rupert murdoch, his son james, and rebekah brooks. >> now we will get an update on the most recent developments in the investigations on phone hacking from british journalist. from "bbc newsnight." >> another resignation. the biggest casualty of the phone hacking scandal. john yates follows the example of his boss and quits more in anchor then onions are a. >> it is malicious gossip published about me. >> another bizarre twist. a man found dead. david cameron cuts short his trade trip to africa. >> the issue is that this will be stopped under my watch. and determined to get to the bottom of it. >> and more on the hearings with rupert murdoch tamara. also, the united states -- we have no -- united states -- [unintelligible] good evening. is britain's police force incompetent or corrupt or both? public confidence in the police is said to be rocky after two high-profile resignations. the police said manning a botched investigation -- admitting a botched investigation, and now an admission that they wer
of rupert murdoch. her lawyer today said that this arrest took her by surprise, that she is not -- that she says she is not guilty of any criminal wrongdoing and that they held her for nine hours yesterday without presenting her with formal allegations or with actual evidence of any wrongdoing. richard. >> all right, thank you, stephanie. nbc's stephanie gosk with the latest on that. news corp published two full-page ads in the british press this weekend, including an apology from rupert murdoch. here's part of the second ad. saying, quote, apologizing for our mistakes and fixing them are only first steps. it may take some time for us to rebuild trust, end quote. let's bring in nbc news national investigative correspondent, michael isikoff. michael, good morning to you. how big of a threat is this in the news of news corp and this scandal? >> it's clearly becoming a bigger and bigger threat. what most people don't realize is that news corp is a huge u.s. media company that owns everything from 20th century fox to fox news channel and the wall street journal and the national geographic chann
's married to rupert murdoch. >> she's having a great time with his money but having -- she's giving him a great time with his money. she has brought him much more into the world. >> she's been good for him. >> she got him to wear black shirts and dye his hair for awhile. >> she's giving him a lot of fun. >> this is not a fair question to ask tina. that's why i'm going to ask you. how did james do? while she was lungeing, he sort of flinched. >> i find him mba speak. he doesn't have any irony about himself at all. he's very humanless. i don't think he has any sort of staying power in the end. >> i understand though that the father absolutely loves the son. >> the father -- >> dedicated to him. >> the father wants a dynasty. for a time it looked like it was lo locklin, now it's james. he dropped out and joined a rock band. >> that's the kind of thing privileged kids can do. i don't think he's appealing. elizabeth is the smartest, the daughter. she of course is married to matthew freud. he's the p.r. svengali. >> i think the jury is out on that. i don't think we know the answer to that. th
-hacking scandal with rupert murdoch and his son james. along with former news international executive rebeckah brooks. they testify at a british parliamentary committee about allegations on phone-hacking and police bribery at the british tabloid. that is live at 9:30 a.m. eastern on c-span3 >> now bbc "newsnight"'s coverage of aldations of -- allegations at rupert murdoch's british tabloid, "news of the world". this is almost an hour. >> tonight scotland yard in turmoil. another resignation of the top. police biggest casualty of the phone-hacking scandal. assistant commissioner john yates follow his boss's example quits more in anger than in sorrow. >> there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion down right malicious gossip being published about me personally. >> another bizarre twist tonight. sean hoare the initial "news of the world" whistle blower is found dead. david cameron cuts short of visit to africa. >> i'm determined to get to the bottom of it. >> tonight we examine the damage he is suffering and the state of the met. then we'll talk about that comm
's doing in trying to feed hungry people. >> mr. speaker, yesterday these evidence sessions rupert murdoch was asked about his frequent meetings with the prime minister and his government to which he replied, i wish they would leave me alone. well, did prime minister and his government would reply without request? [laughter] >> one of the outcomes of all of this there will be a lot of people leaving alone. >> mr. speaker, in the operation motorman investigation, the information commissioner found 861 personal, 861 personal information transactions which were positively identified as coming from 89 mirror group newspaper journalists. can the prime minister confirm that the inquiry that he has announced will be able to look into the unlawful practices going on at mirror group newspapers? >> i think the honorable gentleman makes an important point which is while we shouldn't believe automatically that these practices were spread right across the media, i think it would be naive to think that they were restricted to one newspaper or one newspaper group and indeed when you look at evidence like
on the eve of rupert and james murdoch's highly anticipated appearance before british lawmakers tomorrow. for more about the fallout this is having on the media empire itself, i'm joined by "vanity fair" contributing editorer -- editor sarah, who offered "war at the wall street journal," an account of that newspaper's takeover. thank you for ginning us. -- joining us. how damaging are the latest resignations for the police and british government and given the tangled relationships in all of this, is anybody going to escape from the scandal unscathed? >> i think what you see now is that people really don't think anyone is safe at this point. not ruperred, not james, rebecca brooks arrested, hinson resigned. this is no longer a u.k. problem or u.s. problem. it's a global problem for news corporation and people are beginning to question whether rupert murdoch can stay on his job. >> all eyes are on the hearings tomorrow when rupert murdoch and his son james are due to give evidence. what can we expect and what's at stake for their business. >> i was just speaking to someone coaching them fo
for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had to find it. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."çç major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >>
stephenson, has resigned. meanwhile, the former chief executive of news international, of rupert murdoch's paper, rebecca brooks, was taken in for questioning, detained some 12 hours sunday night and released just after midnight. there was speculation that would have meant that she wouldn't have turned up on tuesday afternoon, london time, to be grilled by politicians. but we're being told by her spokesman that she will be there. she won't appear together with james and rupert murdoch. she'll appear after them. she'll have to be careful about what she says and the politicians, equally, have said they'll be careful about which questions they ask and how they frame those questions. they don't want to clearly prejudice any possible trial that may come out of this. it will be a committee session view bid millions of people, i would expect, with lots of people wanting to know who knew what, how high up the newspaper group into rupert murdoch's empire this scandal went. kyra? >> cnn will have live coverage of tomorrow's expected testimony by brooks, rupert murdo kr. h and his son, james. it's
will questioned after rupert and james murdoch. it will be the first time we hear rupert marurdoch questione about the affair. there will be no hiding tomorrow. the spotlight will be firmly on him. >> what can we expect, do we think, the murdochs to say tomorrow? do you expect any big surprises? >> reporter: well, the whole party line, if you like, has been we didn't know what was going on, and we had no idea about the extent of illegal activities. i think they will be requesting closely about come on, guys, there was money being written out to the detectives doing some of the illegal work, and you were signing the checks, didn't you have any idea this was going on? that will be difficult for them. if they say they didn't know, that is incompetent, and then if they did, then that is something else, and i think they will have a tough time. >> dan rivers in london for us. thank you. robert and james murdoch and rebekah brooks are scheduled to be questioned by parliament tomorrow. >>> and then we will bring you an announcement as soon as it happens from president obama. >>> and hugs all around for th
for us. >> mr. rupert murdoch, have you considered suing harbottle & lewis? you said in the past -- in one of your first answers to my colleague, tom watson -- that you relied on the investigation by the police, the investigation by the press complaints commission, and the investigation undertaken by your solicitors, harbottle & lewis, under whose care this enormous pile of documents was found. there is an old saying, that if you want something doing, you should do it yourself. in this case, you relied on three sets of people, all of whose investigations were severely lacking. have you considered suing harbottle & lewis? >> any future legal claims or actions in any matter are a matter for the future. really, today, this is about how we actually make sure that these things don't happen again. i won't comment or speculate on any future legal matters. >> ok. the file of evidence, you were asked by my colleague, mr. farrelly, whether you had read it yourself and you said no. in the circumstances, where you have rely on other people and advisers and they have severely let your company
in the phone hacking scandal that's rocking rupert murdoch's media empire. just minutes ago, the assistant police commissioner, john yates resigned. this follows the resignation of scotland yard's top official this weekend and the arrest of one of murdoch's closest associates. nbc's stephanie gosk is live in london. stephanie, when you hear about all of these resignations. some in government, some in news corp, it draws the picture of what was apparently a very tight-knit, closed circle between the government and the media in london. does it not? >> reporter: well, yeah, it does, chuck. this story started off about phone hacking and it very quickly has become a story about influence. this has really been an amazing 24 hours here. you have two high-level officials from scotland yard. the chief of police, sir paul stephenson, and his deputy, john yates, resigning. and then on top of that, his organization, his department, arrests a top executive at news corp, a trusted executive, rebekah brooks, who has been a lightning rod in this scandal. now, yates and stephenson have resigned over the co
committee. in two hours rupert murdoch and his son james along with former news international executive rebecca bob brooks will testify at a british parliamentary committee of allegations of phone hacking live on c-span3. now live to a hearing focusing on metropolitan police and its hearing on the previous and current investigations on phone hacking. chairman of the british home committee is speaking. >> -- which was hosted by the federation. and sponsored by the government. you both know about the owner of the champions but i was invited to the news international some party recently but did not attend. are there any other interested members who need to declare directly or indirectly? >> the events are declared with interest. and the chief executive -- >> thank you very much. coming. let me express -- [inaudible] -- we'll read your statement very carefully that there is no impropriety to what has happened. you think you have done nothing wrong. you had no direct involvement as far as two investigations on the so-called review of the investigation but you felt you should resign. why did
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)

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